The Cape wild fig, also referred to as the broom cluster fig (besemtrosvy),is one of the very widespread figs in South Africa. Reaching a peak of 25 — 35m, this evergreen or semi-deciduous tree frequents frost-free terrain in the coast towards the mountains, occurring largely near riverbanks along forest borders and in wooded grassland.

Beautiful Cape wild fig for large gardens Ficus sur

The Cape wild fig, also referred to as the broom cluster fig (besemtrosvy),is one of the very widespread figs in South Africa. Reaching a peak of 25 — 35m, this evergreen or semi-deciduous tree frequents frost-free terrain in the coast towards the mountains, occurring largely near riverbanks along forest borders and in wooded grassland.

In mild climates it remains evergreen, but towards the interior it loses a number of its leaves in winter. The shrub includes a solitary or sometimes buttressed trunk with sleek, light gray bark. The branches form a gigantic, spreading combination of elliptic or oval-shaped, dark green or grey-green leaves with serrated, wavy margins, and that are initially coppery when they emerge . The figs are created in striking clusters along the trunk and lowermost branches, and may appear at any time of year but develop mainly in spring and ripen towards midsummer. They are initially green, eventually maturing to pinkish- red or purple, and also create a musty odour when mature.
This fast-growing, rugged fig is recommended as a superb specimen feature or shade-tree, planted in groves from massive gardens, parks and golf courses, and for attracting wildlife into the garden. It enjoys a position in full sun or light shade, and so is best planted from nursery containers , at a well-composted, loamy soil, and retained well-watered for the first half an hour, or until well recognized. It’s ideal for poorly drained areas and may take as much water as it could get, particularly in summer.
It ought to be planted well away from walls, paving, pools and pipes, as its vigorous roots are highly invasive in restricted spaces.
It is also important to keep in mind that the figs create a significant slippery mess once they have dropped.
When fully ripe, the sweet-tasting fruit of this Cape wild fig is widely eaten by local people,birds and animals, such as rabbits. The figs make a flavorful jam, nevertheless they’re often heavily parasitised by insects.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *